In The News...

Mobile crisis teams would make house calls to children with mental health problems within an hour anywhere in the state under a bill backed by a Senate committee Tuesday.

School nurses do a lot more than dispense medication and take temperatures these days, which is why the state Legislature four years ago passed a bill raising their education requirement from a two-year to a four-year degree.

As an educator, counselor, mother, and citizen, I have experienced over and over again just how difficult it is for children in crisis to receive the support they need in a timely and humane way. When a child shares suicidal thoughts with me, my best response (as things are now) is to notify a parent (who may or may not take action to seek help for their child.)

The ongoing mental health, substance misuse, and child protection crises have taken a significant toll on New Hampshire's children and families, impacting all child-serving systems and placing increased pressure on the children's behavioral health system.

New Hampshire needs a full system of care to support children with mental health concerns. One of the most important things we can do for our kids is to make mobile crisis services available everywhere in the state. Mobile crisis responds immediately when kids are in a behavioral health crisis, like when they are suicidal. They assess the child, resolve the immediate crisis, and help connect the children and families with supports.

Statehouse lawmakers heard over two hours of testimony today on a bill to overhaul the state's current school discipline law.

Jason Dickey’s mother, Martha, remembers him as a fun and outgoing young man with a larger than life personality.

Yet he was consumed by despair so deep he took his own life on Sept. 14, 2017, at age 19.

The Boscawen teen was among 38 young people in New Hampshire who died by suicide that year in a state where the rate of youth suicide (under age 24) is nearly 50 percent higher than the national average and climbing.

Jason Dickey’s mother, Martha, remembers him as a fun and outgoing young man with a larger than life personality.

Yet he was consumed by despair so deep he took his own life on Sept. 14, 2017, at age 19.

The Boscawen teen was among 38 young people in New Hampshire who died by suicide that year in a state where the rate of youth suicide (under age 24) is nearly 50 percent higher than the national average and climbing.

Since their son died, Martha and Paul Dickey have had little time to pause. The two have held fundraisers, launched community walks, made bracelets, and spoken to groups across the state about Jason’s life and the cause of his death: suicide.

“We asked ourselves: What did we miss? What we could we have done to save him? Where did we go wrong?” Dickey said. 

Students with disabilities and minority students are more likely than other pupils to face educationally disruptive, out-of-school suspensions, according to findings issued Monday by social service organizations and civil rights groups.